January 19, 2017

Bottom Feeder Tool for Bowls......

   Well, there is always something new it seems. Well maybe only to yours truly.......

   We found a tool last Winter that has been named Bottom Feeder by Frank Johanson of Sarasota. This tools is designed to be able to shape the bottom of a bowl -large or small-  with minimum fuss in sanding it afterwards.
     When we turn an end  grain bowl there always seems to be those two spots on opposite sides of the bowl where the grain is not cut just right. Thus we end up starting to sand with 80 or even 60 grit and it takes forever to get it smooth enough to look good.

    Now Frank had this tool designed, resharpened, and repositioned and tested.

                                      IT WORKS!

Now grind off the "heel" a bit....


                                                                   Then a tiny portion of the point is sharpened to a 75 degree angle
         The Bottom Feeder is Born!!!!____

The tool is then 
presented to the bottom of the bowl with the open (Groove) up and a slight angle to the left. Only the 75 degree portion is in touch with the wood.  The heel is removed to allow the first angle to be used to carefully cut as needed. You may find a different angle will work best for you but I assure it is great tool. 

When one practices several times it will bring up a very very nice smooth bowl bottom with a good smooth surface.  Maybe some 240 grit followed by 400 and such. Saves on purchasing all that 60 grit abrasive! (I know you like Klingspor but not that much!)

It is wonderful.
Yours truly has tested it and WHOA! it works. 

This works well using a tool like a 1/2" spindle or  1/2" detail gouge. Re-sharpen as above and get ready for brilliant bowl work with minimal sanding required.

This is free just for being a Member of the Waxhaw Woodturners Club (courtesy of Frank Johanson of course).


-presented by Moe Gingrich



PS.    A group of hens (or female chickens) is called a brood, and a group of baby chicks is called a clutch. However a group of eagles is referred to as a convocation.